What You Probably Didn't Know About Termites In Queen Creek

May 29, 2020

You might already realize that termites can do significant damage to your home in Queen Creek. But termites are interesting pests and there are a few things about them that you might not know. Learn some interesting facts about termites, including how you can prevent them.

termites creating tunnels in a wooden structure

The Termite Caste System

Unlike most other pests, termites have an unusual way of living. They rely on a caste system, with each type of termite playing an important role in their society. First, there are the worker termites. These insects are unable to reproduce. It’s their job to find food, build nests, and care for the young in the colony. In most species of termites, the workers are blind.
 
Meanwhile, soldier termites are responsible for protecting the colony. They have mandibles that are used as weapons. Much like worker termites, the soldiers cannot reproduce and are usually blind.
 
At the peak of the termite social structure, you can find the alates. These termites have wings and are responsible for mating and creating new colonies. In warm weather, the alates leave a mature colony, mate with one another, lose their wings, then burrow into the ground to start new colonies.

How Termites Help The Environment

Although termites are bad for your home environment, they are beneficial to the overall environment. They are considered decomposers because they break down plant fibers. When a tree dies, termites take on the role of turning it into soil. Termites also help the soil. As they tunnel through it, they aerate the ground and make it more suitable for plants and trees. Without termites, nature would suffer.

Unique Family Systems

In most species of animals and insects, the females take on most of the parenting duties. However, termites are unique in that the fathers take care of the young. A termite king stays with the queen and fertilizes her eggs. Then he helps her feed the young.

Chemical Communicatio

Although termites can’t talk, they can communicate. They do so through the use of pheromones, or chemical cues. To control one another and communicate, termites leave behind scent trails. They have glands on their chests that produce scents, and other termites “read” those scents with their cuticles.

They’re Well-Groomed

Believe it or not, termites are clean pests. Despite spending so much time in the dirt, termites like to stay clean. They spend their spare time grooming one another. This isn’t for appearances as much as it is to keep the colony alive. By grooming each other, termites prevent parasites and keep bacteria under control.

Removing Termites Is No Easy Task

Termites are interesting creatures, but you don’t want to encounter them in your home. Once a termite colony finds your home, they don't want to leave. Most homes contain enough wood to keep a colony content and well-fed.
 
As a termite eats the wood in your home, it damages the structure. They chew through wood quickly and can cause thousands of dollars in damage. Unfortunately, most homeowners don’t see the damage until it's too late.
 
Removing termites is difficult because they remain hidden and they breed quickly. Before you can even begin to exterminate the colony, you need to know what species is in your home. You also need to have the right tools and methods for eliminating the pests. Otherwise, the colony will persist and continue to do damage.
 
If you want to prevent a large repair bill, you need to act quickly. Your best chance at stopping or preventing an infestation is to work with an experienced pest control in Queen Creek. Contact the professionals at All Clear for more advice or assistance.

Tags: termites | termite control | home pest control |

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